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Courtesy of: SnapKnot

if-you-leave:

Submit your work for the 2014 IYL Showcase!

The focus of the Showcase is on a single image, as opposed to a series or a body of work, so please select your most powerful individual images. (FAQ: http://tinyurl.com/n9d85j5)

The deadline for entries is July 8th 2014, and entry is limited to 10 images per photographer.

To enter, submit your photos through flickr or email:
flickr.com/groups/if-you-leave
showcase_2014@if-you-leave.com

Please support our Kickstarter campaign to keep the competition free    http://kck.st/1hOmPxd

Good Luck!

(image by Jessica Levin)

Timestamp: 1402246381

if-you-leave:

Submit your work for the 2014 IYL Showcase!

The focus of the Showcase is on a single image, as opposed to a series or a body of work, so please select your most powerful individual images. (FAQ: http://tinyurl.com/n9d85j5)

The deadline for entries is July 8th 2014, and entry is limited to 10 images per photographer.

To enter, submit your photos through flickr or email:
flickr.com/groups/if-you-leave
showcase_2014@if-you-leave.com

Please support our Kickstarter campaign to keep the competition free    http://kck.st/1hOmPxd

Good Luck!

(image by Jessica Levin)

coolchicksfromhistory:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

mildhorror:

Here’s the link for more information about the PS244 fundraising campaign

Here’s the link to the GIVE IT ALL TO ME Library Collection at OutofPrintClothing.com.

Check it out! The good folks dropped me a line about this project last week, and I’m happy to boost for Library Week.

Signal boost

Timestamp: 1397598414

coolchicksfromhistory:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

mildhorror:

Here’s the link for more information about the PS244 fundraising campaign

Here’s the link to the GIVE IT ALL TO ME Library Collection at OutofPrintClothing.com.

Check it out! The good folks dropped me a line about this project last week, and I’m happy to boost for Library Week.

Signal boost

jtotheizzoe:

Through the Looking Glass, Into the Brain

Book review! I just read Neurocomic (Amazon), a new graphic novel by Drs. Hana Ros & Matteo Farinella (who is on Tumblr). While not perfect, it presents the history and science of brain research in a way I’ve never before seen. I wish there was more of this art/science crossover in science books, don’t you?

Neurocomic is one man’s Lewis Carroll-esque journey through the human brain (his own?), where, after becoming trapped in a daydream, he encounters micro-avatars of the very neuroscientists who first unlocked the secrets of neuroscience. He also gets some rather psychedelic biology lessons along the way, falling through axons, parachuting out of synaptic vesicles, fighting the Kraken (who I assume has come for revenge on all that giant squid axon research that scientists have done over the years), discovering the power of hallucinogens (the hard way… no, make that the FUN way), and even breaking up some fisticuffs between Messrs. Golgi and Ramon y Cajal.

But like any book that attempts to hit every highlight of neuroscience, as well as the people who have studied it, in less than 150 pages, it was often superficial, and I was left wanting in parts. This book’s a bit like the cerebral cortex in that way: Interesting and full of action, but ultimately concealing a lot of cool stuff going on underneath. While the text was a bit academic in parts, the illustrations are superb, both fantastic and fantastical. I half expected the Cheshire Cat to pop up (instead I got a talking version of Pavlov’s dog).

Neurocomic won’t leave you ready to enter a neuroscience PhD program, but it does present some amazing science in a genre-busting, outlandish, imaginative way. All in all, journey through the looking glass into an imaginary world inside our own minds. And isn’t that what reading a story is all about?

Timestamp: 1396401149

jtotheizzoe:

Through the Looking Glass, Into the Brain

Book review! I just read Neurocomic (Amazon), a new graphic novel by Drs. Hana Ros & Matteo Farinella (who is on Tumblr). While not perfect, it presents the history and science of brain research in a way I’ve never before seen. I wish there was more of this art/science crossover in science books, don’t you?

Neurocomic is one man’s Lewis Carroll-esque journey through the human brain (his own?), where, after becoming trapped in a daydream, he encounters micro-avatars of the very neuroscientists who first unlocked the secrets of neuroscience. He also gets some rather psychedelic biology lessons along the way, falling through axons, parachuting out of synaptic vesicles, fighting the Kraken (who I assume has come for revenge on all that giant squid axon research that scientists have done over the years), discovering the power of hallucinogens (the hard way… no, make that the FUN way), and even breaking up some fisticuffs between Messrs. Golgi and Ramon y Cajal.

But like any book that attempts to hit every highlight of neuroscience, as well as the people who have studied it, in less than 150 pages, it was often superficial, and I was left wanting in parts. This book’s a bit like the cerebral cortex in that way: Interesting and full of action, but ultimately concealing a lot of cool stuff going on underneath. While the text was a bit academic in parts, the illustrations are superb, both fantastic and fantastical. I half expected the Cheshire Cat to pop up (instead I got a talking version of Pavlov’s dog).

Neurocomic won’t leave you ready to enter a neuroscience PhD program, but it does present some amazing science in a genre-busting, outlandish, imaginative way. All in all, journey through the looking glass into an imaginary world inside our own minds. And isn’t that what reading a story is all about?

photojojo:

If you’ve ever wanted to sip a latte inside of a camera, your bizarre dream is now a reality. 

The Dreaming Camera Cafe outside of Seoul, South Korea doubles as a coffee shop and camera museum. What’s not to love?

This Massive Rolleiflex Camera Doubles as a Coffee Shop

via Colossal

Timestamp: 1396378638

photojojo:

If you’ve ever wanted to sip a latte inside of a camera, your bizarre dream is now a reality. 

The Dreaming Camera Cafe outside of Seoul, South Korea doubles as a coffee shop and camera museum. What’s not to love?

This Massive Rolleiflex Camera Doubles as a Coffee Shop

via Colossal

lezly-odair:

How I feel about religion. God should be presented as what he is, love and kindness. Stop using his name to justify your racism, homo phobia and sexism

(via thefuuuucomics)

Timestamp: 1394592477

lezly-odair:

How I feel about religion. God should be presented as what he is, love and kindness. Stop using his name to justify your racism, homo phobia and sexism

(via thefuuuucomics)

jtotheizzoe:

See that woman? That is not Marie Curie.

I mean, it is Marie Curie, but only in a sense.

If you type “Marie Curie” into Google image search, you’ll likely see this colorized photo pop up several times in the results. You might even find the original black and white. Go ahead. Try it. You’ll see this picture on postage stamps, in meme photos, and even in the form of a Marie Curie bobblehead doll (one of which I own), all purported to be the one, true Marie Curie.

But it’s not her. I know this because I met this Marie Curie, just last week.

Her name is Susan Marie Frontczak. She performs as Maria Sklodowska in a living history stage show called Manyathat tours around the world, bringing Madame Curie’s science and soul to life.

The photo shows Susan striking a thoughtful, Curiesque stance, dressed in her period-appropriate Curie garb (It was Marie who famously said “I have no dress except the one I wear every day. If you are going to be kind enough to give me one, please let it be practical and dark so that I can put it on afterwards to go to the laboratory.”) The photo was posted to the web a few years ago, and thanks to that game of internet telephone known as “attribution-free viral image sharing” she has, in a very real way, become Marie Curie. At least in the eyes of Togo.

And Mali, and Zambia, and Guinea-Bissau, and the Republic of Guinea. All have released stamps using Susan’s photo as “Marie Curie”, often alongside real photos of Marie Curie, who Susan looks remarkably like, but not so close that one would be confused when looking at their pictures literally side by side

Susan has also been immortalized in science’s Last Supper (below), sandwiched between Galileo and J. Robert Oppenheimer, playing the part of the apostle James (son of Alphaeus, not the Zebedee one). It occurs to me that I have no idea which Redditor or other meme-oriented individual originally made this Last Supper image. The irony does not escape me.

Susan’s trademark pose, with extended right arm holding aloft a mysterious blue liquid we can assume represents that mere tenth of a gram of radium chloride Curie painstakingly extracted from one ton of pitchblende, complete with the thousand-yard stare of Nobelian gravitas, is carved daily by Chinese factory workers into top-heavy, spring-necked plastic figurines. Ah, to be immortalized in bobblehead form, on someone else’s bobblehead! 

Did I mention no one has paid Susan for any of this?

This is an entertaining, but all-too-typical tale of the Modern Internet™. Susan doesn’t make a ton of money from her show, and I wonder how much she’s missed out on with people using her likeness without permission? I wonder how many other artists we could put in Marie’s … I mean Susan’s place, who lose out daily as their work is posted online without links or permission, spreading out of control like a radium-induced cancer? 

Susan would like to adapt Manya into a film some day, to help spread Marie Curie’s legacy worldwide to new audeinces. Maybe Togo, Mali, Zambia, and the various Guineas could see it in their pilfering philatelist hearts to send her a small donation? And maybe we can all be a bit more careful in the future, and treat these wonderfully creative science artists a bit nicer, and show them off, instead of showing off ourselves?

I mean, what would Marie Curie do? I asked her, last week. She said she’d like to be recognized.

Stamp and portrait images courtesy of Susan Marie Frontczak

Timestamp: 1394591898

jtotheizzoe:

See that woman? That is not Marie Curie.

I mean, it is Marie Curie, but only in a sense.

If you type “Marie Curie” into Google image search, you’ll likely see this colorized photo pop up several times in the results. You might even find the original black and white. Go ahead. Try it. You’ll see this picture on postage stamps, in meme photos, and even in the form of a Marie Curie bobblehead doll (one of which I own), all purported to be the one, true Marie Curie.

But it’s not her. I know this because I met this Marie Curie, just last week.

Her name is Susan Marie Frontczak. She performs as Maria Sklodowska in a living history stage show called Manyathat tours around the world, bringing Madame Curie’s science and soul to life.

The photo shows Susan striking a thoughtful, Curiesque stance, dressed in her period-appropriate Curie garb (It was Marie who famously said “I have no dress except the one I wear every day. If you are going to be kind enough to give me one, please let it be practical and dark so that I can put it on afterwards to go to the laboratory.”) The photo was posted to the web a few years ago, and thanks to that game of internet telephone known as “attribution-free viral image sharing” she has, in a very real way, become Marie Curie. At least in the eyes of Togo.

And Mali, and Zambia, and Guinea-Bissau, and the Republic of Guinea. All have released stamps using Susan’s photo as “Marie Curie”, often alongside real photos of Marie Curie, who Susan looks remarkably like, but not so close that one would be confused when looking at their pictures literally side by side

Susan has also been immortalized in science’s Last Supper (below), sandwiched between Galileo and J. Robert Oppenheimer, playing the part of the apostle James (son of Alphaeus, not the Zebedee one). It occurs to me that I have no idea which Redditor or other meme-oriented individual originally made this Last Supper image. The irony does not escape me.

Susan’s trademark pose, with extended right arm holding aloft a mysterious blue liquid we can assume represents that mere tenth of a gram of radium chloride Curie painstakingly extracted from one ton of pitchblende, complete with the thousand-yard stare of Nobelian gravitas, is carved daily by Chinese factory workers into top-heavy, spring-necked plastic figurines. Ah, to be immortalized in bobblehead form, on someone else’s bobblehead! 

Did I mention no one has paid Susan for any of this?

This is an entertaining, but all-too-typical tale of the Modern Internet™. Susan doesn’t make a ton of money from her show, and I wonder how much she’s missed out on with people using her likeness without permission? I wonder how many other artists we could put in Marie’s … I mean Susan’s place, who lose out daily as their work is posted online without links or permission, spreading out of control like a radium-induced cancer? 

Susan would like to adapt Manya into a film some day, to help spread Marie Curie’s legacy worldwide to new audeinces. Maybe Togo, Mali, Zambia, and the various Guineas could see it in their pilfering philatelist hearts to send her a small donation? And maybe we can all be a bit more careful in the future, and treat these wonderfully creative science artists a bit nicer, and show them off, instead of showing off ourselves?

I mean, what would Marie Curie do? I asked her, last week. She said she’d like to be recognized.

Stamp and portrait images courtesy of Susan Marie Frontczak